Sunday, May 22, 2011

Sanctuary Established for the Tasmanian Devil (Video) *Cancer pushes endangered Devil to near extinction*

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The iconic, and carnivorous, Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harisii)


Tasmania Establishes Sanctuary for the Endangered Tasmanian Devil

Tasmanian Devil in Trouble A sanctuary on the island of Tasmania has been built for the legendary Tasmanian Devil. Devil Facial Tumor Disease has decimated the population by an estimated 70% in the last 15 years. In some hard-hit areas the population has plummeted by 90%. The sanctuary is to isolate healthy Devils from the disease and establish a non-infected breeding population. The Tasmanian Devil is potentially facing extinction due to this Disease.

Devil Facial Tumor Disease It is believed that the Devil Facial Tumor Disease is spread through the saliva, when the Devils scuffle, and bite, each other during the mating season. Tumors form on the face and ultimately they cannot eat and die of starvation. Efforts continue to discover a cure or vaccine. To save the species some Tasmanian Devils have been placed in zoos. However, a new approach is now being undertaken.

Free Range Enclosures FREs, a quarantined environment, are being built to save the Tasmanian Devil. The sanctuaries are on islands, dubbed Devil Islands, and walls are built as a biosecurity measure to isolate the healthy individuals. This allows the Devils to be disease-free, safe, and maintain their wild behaviors. These sanctuaries hold the "insurance population" and it is hoped someday, when the disease has been controlled, these Devils can be released back into the wild, into their native habitat.

Tasmania Builds Sanctuary for the Devil Conservationists hope a new sanctuary will save Australia's declining Tasmanian Devil population. Gemma Haines reports.



Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Services
The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.


Save The Tasmanian Devil
Devil Facial Tumor Disease threatens the existence of this internationally recognized icon.


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Friday, May 20, 2011

Rare Sumatran Tigers Recorded on Camera (Video) *Critically Endangered: about 400 tigers remaining in Sumatra*

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Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)


Rare Sumatran Tigers Recorded on Camera

A World Wildlife Fund (WWF) effort has captured critically endangered Sumatran tigers on camera trap video. WWF estimates the worldwide population of Sumatran tigers at "around 400". This tiger subspecies only remains on the island of Sumatra, its last stronghold. The species previously lived throughout Indonesia, including Bali and Java.

A total of 12 tigers, including 2 mothers each with a cub, were recorded over a period of 2 months in the central Sumatra area of Bukit Tigapuluh. 3 young tigers were recorded playing with a leaf. This evidence of breeding in the area gives hope for the sustainability of the species. However, the area monitored is not protected and is designated an "industrial forest estate". Habitat destruction by deforestation has caused the Sumatran tiger population to be classified as critically endangered.

There is a real possibility the tigers recorded will ultimately lose their habitat through logging. "Rampant deforestation" has occurred in this area. Palm oil and paper plantations have replaced the original habitat. Poaching is also a concern, especially as tigers are forced from native habitat by deforestation. The Bali and Java tigers, also Indonesian tigers, are gone as a result of deforestation on those neighboring islands. That leaves the tigers of Sumatra as the last Indonesian tigers.

Rare Tigers Caught on Camera Endangered Sumatran tigers have been caught on camera in an Indonesian forest. Gemma Haines reports.




The Sumatran tiger is found exclusively on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, the last stronghold for tigers in Indonesia.


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Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Confessions of an Eco-Terrorist (Video) *Sea Shepherd Society: epic tale of world's most wanted environmental heroes*

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Confessions of an Eco-Terrorist: Nature Needs A Mother Like Him


Epic Tale of the World's Most Wanted Environmental Heroes Thirty years ago the sea was being plundered, threatening the balance of life. The Sea Shepherd Society began protecting the oceans and the life within. The film is a thirty-year journey with Paul Watson, Peter Brown, and Bob Hunter as they challenge  and confront people and organizations destroying the environment. They are attacked by individuals, fired on by the Norwegian Navy, rammed by other ships, and assaulted by the assaulters of the environment, whales, seals, and life. This is an inspirational documentary for all who are against human greed and corporate profiteering destroying planet Earth for their short-term gains.

Confessions of an Eco-Terrorist Synopsis
Release Date Coming Soon!
Genre Not your ordinary Eco Doc.
Description The hard-nosed cast of characters in the film exude bravery and wit, all while engaging in action-packed conflict including boarding ships, arrests, ramming of illegal fishing vessels as well as sinking of pirate whalers. These activists have dedicated their lives to decades of campaigns to halt the atrocities committed worldwide against sea mammals. After watching the film, one cannot help but be inspired to go out and create change, working to make a difference in the world.
Plot Outline Confessions of an Eco-Terrorist (Confessions) is not your typical eco-film. Seen through the eyes of activist Peter Jay Brown (from Whale Wars), Confessions grants the viewer an intimate look at shipboard life amongst these self-proclaimed animal saviors and sea rebels, the ones who helped shape the Green Movement we know and love today. Alongside Captain Paul Watson of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Peter and fellow crew members' exploits are as much comedy as cause. These extremists proudly fly their version of the skull and crossbones while performing extraordinary feats of daring on the high seas. Their fleet of ships has for thirty years halted illegal fishing activities, inflicting damage to whalers, illegal drift-netters, long liners, and seal hunters operating illegally worldwide. Spanning across the continents, Peter Brown takes us on a journey through locations such as The North Pacific Ocean, Galapagos Islands, the Faroe Islands, and Norway, illuminating the whales' and seals' perils.
Starring Paul Watson, Peter Brown, Bob Hunter
Directed By Peter Jay Brown
Written By Timothy Huntley
Produced By Ron Moler, Larry Mortorff, Rob Holden, Martin Kistler

Confessions of an Eco-Terrorist Official Trailer for Confessions of an Eco-Terrorist, and official selection of the Santa Barbara International Film Festival.


Blue Seals was founded and is led by a dedicated group of activists who care deeply about the Earth’s oceans and the universe of life within them. We are the Air Force of the ocean conservation movement, the eyes in the sky, identifying, fighting, and preventing environmental crimes.


Sea Shephered's Mission Statement: Established in 1977, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (SSCS) is an international non-profit, marine wildlife conservation organization. Our mission is to end the destruction of habitat and slaughter of wildlife in the world's oceans in order to conserve and protect ecosystems and species. Sea Shepherd uses innovative direct-action tactics to investigate, document, and take action when necessary to expose and confront illegal activities on the high seas. By safeguarding the biodiversity of our delicately-balanced ocean ecosystems, Sea Shepherd works to ensure their survival for future generations.


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Monday, May 2, 2011

Endangered Whales Appear Off Cape Cod (Video) *North Atlantic Right Whales one of rarest marine mammals*

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North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis): Mother with Calf


Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales Appear Off Cape Cod The seasonal appearance of endangered whales, including North Atlantic Right Whales, has occurred off the coast of Massachusetts this spring. This latest gathering is considered the largest since these whales became endangered and they can be easily seen from shore.

"These are probably rarest of the large whales" Charles "Stormy" Mayo, a senior scientist at the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, Massachusetts, says the whales are following their food, zooplankton and krill. There are only an estimated 473 North Atlantic Right Whales remaining and more than 200 have been spotted off the coast of Massachusetts. That's approximately 42% of the entire known population!

Whaling Decimated Population Whaling almost completely killed off the North Atlantic Right Whale. These slow-swimming, peaceful marine mammals, weighing up to 70 tons, growing to 55 feet long, and living 50+ years, were easy prey for whalers. Tens of thousands of North Atlantic Right Whales were slaughtered until an estimated mere 100 remained. Whaling of these mammals was originally banned in the 1930s and they are slowly making a comeback through various conservation efforts.

Right Whales The population of western North Atlantic Right Whales are all near North America. The eastern population that once lived from the coast of northern Europe to the coast northwest Africa is presumed extinct. The species of Right Whales and relatives per Wikipedia:
● 400 to 450 North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) live in the North Atlantic
● 30 - 50 North Pacific right whales live in the eastern North Pacific (Eubalaena japonica) and perhaps 100-200 more in the Sea of Okhotsk
● 12,000 Southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) are spread throughout the southern part of the Southern Hemisphere
● 9,000 - 10,000 bowhead whales are distributed entirely in the Arctic Ocean and sub-polar seas

Endangered Whales Spotted Off Massachusetts Coast Tourists and scientists marvel at the ocean mammals.

video


"We believe the preservation of marine and coastal habitats and the recovery of species is crucial to the health of all life."


NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources: North Atlantic Right Whale
Right whales were first protected by the 1931 Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, which took effect in 1935. However, neither Japan nor the Soviet Union signed this agreement, so they were theoretically free to kill right whales.


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